Posted by: christinelaennec | May 16, 2014

Morning service at Govan Old church, Glasgow

I know not everyone is as keen on church as I am.  But if you are in Glasgow, and the idea of a short morning service (20 minutes) appeals to you, let me recommend Govan Old church.  The services are held in this lovely little side chapel:

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

You walk past some of the many amazing carved stones to go into the chapel.  This is the Govan sarcophagus:

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

My photos aren’t the best, but you can see the Celtic knotwork:

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

Govan Old church, Glasgow.

Govan Old has been a place of worship for centuries, and I wrote a little bit about the Govan stones here.  As a churchgoer who has some insight into the work involved in putting on a weekly service, I think it’s wonderful that the people of Govan Old hold a short service every weekday morning.  It is (for me) a beautiful service, sometimes taken by the minister, sometimes by others.  There is such a sense of peace in this service.  I find the atmosphere hard to describe.  All are welcome, and you can have a cup of tea afterwards.

By the way, I’ve worked out how they say the Lord’s Prayer so quickly here in Glasgow – a few of the churches actually use a different and shorter version of the one I’m familiar with.  So it isn’t just the speedy Glasgow patter.

There are various ways to get to Govan Old church.  In the summertime, you can take a ferry from the Riverside Museum! The Govan Stones website has a good information page here.

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Responses

  1. I’m not a church-goer, Christine, but I have a fascination for churches. Thank you for sharing this one.

  2. Strangely enough, I was admiring your previous post about this church just last night! [I’m honestly not a crazy blog stalker — I’m going to be stuck in Glasgow for the next few weeks & was curious to see your opinion on any churches in the area.]

    I love that they have a service every day – it seems like it’d be a nice way to ground yourself, ready to face the ups and downs of the day ahead. I’m sure most of us could benefit from being a little more disciplined in that.
    The building looks utterly fascinating too – wow!

    xo

  3. fabulous Church. would love to attend 🙂 thanks for posting about this.

  4. It looks like a really lovely place.

  5. So interesting, Christine…my friend from the Midwest who visited last week is an Eastern Orthodox priest. I have been to five services recently, Vespers and two Matin services and believe that God is encouraging me to participate in Orthodoxy…be a part of the family. I want to go back and check out your links in this post. xx

  6. So nice that they have a daily service! Never heard of a shortened Lord’s Prayer!!!

  7. What a delight, Christine. My favorite place to visit in Europe was the old churches. I even have a page dedicated just to churches! xo

  8. Do they leave the Doxology (“For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen”) off the end? The earliest Bible texts don’t have it as part of the prayer so some people leave it off.

    What a lovely service, I’ve been thinking a lot about rhythms of prayer lately, grounding the day in regular, not necessarily long, times of prayer. Not always wonderfully disciplined at it though.

  9. Twenty minutes!? Wow, that is short. Sweet, too, I imagine. I reckon that sort of event is really good for a person to have in their life….a short time in which your focus is fundamentally changed from the other 23 hours and 40 minutes, in a way that refreshes and revives.

    But what a teaser – for those who won’t make it to Glasgow any time soon, which parts of The Lord’s Prayer are omitted?

  10. Thanks, everyone, for your comments. I think there is a lot to be said for a 20-minute service! If I lived closer, I would pop in there a lot (or so I imagine). I think it would be a nice way to start the day.

    The Lord’s Prayer I have heard said here is shorter not because it leaves anything out as such (Stephanie, I always thought it was just Catholics who left the last few lines off but maybe not), but because there are fewer words. I’ll look into it and maybe do a post about it, since I have piqued your interest!


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